Tag Archives: Heavy metal

Moshiach Oi! release lyric video for “Sitra Achra is Dangerous”

Hardcore punks Moshiach Oi! have released a lyric video for “Sitra Achra is Dangerous“, off their latest album Rock Rabeinu. The clip, which evokes both street art and Breslov gedolim, was created by Fiverr user ‘guywhoedits’.

The lyrics are themed around spiritual warfare (“sitra achra” is a Kabbalistic term meaning “Other Side”, the realm of evil), with audio samples from an unnamed rav emphasizing the emptiness of the physical world. Musically, the song is one of the heavier on the album, bordering on metal in the intro, but their punk lineage is revealed through some Black Flag references – the opening chant is from “Rise Above”, while the verse guitar riff is modeled on “Six Pack”.

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Purged Inside Release New Single “Bring Me Close”

Fresh off their self-titled EP earlier this year, NY metalcore outfit Purged Inside have released the new single “Bring Me Close“. The song is from their upcoming full-length debut, What Lies Ahead.

Channeling bands like August Burns Red and As I Lay Dying, “Bring Me Close” opens with a calmly ambient intro before slamming into the genre-appropriate chaos.  As guitarist Yitzie Bruck lays down winding melodic metal riffs, frontman Yakov Smith, sounding an awful like ABR’s Jake Luhrs, transitions between brutal death growls and shrieks and hardcore-inspired shouts and chants with impressive ease.

You can check it out on Bandcamp below:

Orphaned Land Celebrates 25 Years With New EP

“Oriental metal” founders Orphaned Land are celebrating their 25th anniversary with the release of a new EP, Orphaned Land & Friends, on Century Media on Friday. Comprised of previously recorded tracks that were either given limited release or none at all, the album features collaborations with artists like Steven Wilson, Yehuda Poliker, Erkin Koray, and Morgan Magal. One of the album’s tracks, a live version of “M I ?” with Steven Wilson, can be heard below. Streaming and download links for the record can be found here.

Jewish Metallers Atzmus Re-Releases “Ser Humano” EP

Nu-metal outfit Atzmus, hailing from Buenos Aires, Argentina, 14900428_10154264639543073_4918105188362626147_nrecently gave their 2015 EP Ser Humano (To Be Human) a streaming release for American audiences. The re-release includes the bonus track “Insurgente” (Insurgent), which, along with the rest of the record, will be included on the group’s upcoming third album, also entitled Ser Humano.

Formed in late 2008, Atzmus (named for a Kabbalah term that translates as “Divine essence”), the band has released two prior albums, 2009’s Ciudad de Luz (City of Light) and 2013’s No Hay Mundo Sin Amor (There’s No World Without Love). In between, they have had considerable success in their home country, including a feature in the Argentine Rolling Stone, appearing in director Daniel Burman’s 2012 film La suerte en tus manos, and spots at La Trastienda Club and the Pepsi Music Festival.

In the aforelinked Rolling Stone piece, frontman Eliezer Barletta, himself a Hasidic Jew, responds to a question about the band’s spirituality: “[N]o one imposes anything on anyone. Sometimes we think that to develop concepts of union or peace between men we have to think all the same, believe all the same, but peace is not homogeneity...There may be men without religion but men can not [be] without love, because the basis and foundation of the world is love. And for that, as musicians we make songs with lyrics that invite reflection and inner development.”

Check out the title video from the EP below. RIYL: Demon Hunter, Disturbed, System of a Down, Orphaned Land.

(Hat tip to Ash at That’s Frum!? for the find.)

Interview: Klunk, Klezmer-Punk from Paris (Michael Croland)

Guest Post by Michael Croland, author of Oy Oy Oy Gevalt! Jews and Punk

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Photo: KRISS PEEKS

Klunk (short for “klezmer-punk”) released their debut EP on March 23. Klunk takes Old World, klezmer songs in Yiddish and mixes them with punk rock and metal. It’s fusion of klezmer with punk (or metal) rather than klezmer with punk elements (along the lines of Golem) or punk rock with klezmer elements (along the lines of Di Nigunim).

The EP’s best klezmer-punk song is “Daloy Polizey.” The title/refrain translates to “Down with the Police.” According to the Jewish Music Research Centre, the song dates back to at least 1905 and “the chorus was shouted rather than sung.” The Centre explained, “The text of the song tends toward anarchism, even anarchist terror, especially in the verse that calls to bury Tsar Nicolai along with his mother. These verses may be connected to more radical sections of the Labor Bund or to smaller groups of Jewish anarchists.” Klunk’s “Daloy Polizey” features raspy vocals, with shouting at times, in addition to crunchy guitar chords and a fast tempo.

Klunk mines Yiddish music of yesteryear for radical/socialist/anarchist songs, reminiscent of Daniel Kahn & The Painted Bird. Klunk’s music is definitely heavier than Kahn’s. I recognized one Klunk song, “Arbetlozer Marsh,” from Kahn’s version. Whereas Kahn added English lyrics to the Yiddish, Klunk added French, so that their audience would understand.

Here is my interview with Jean-Gabriel Davis, lead singer and pianist of Klunk.

In “Daloy Polizey,” I hear Klunk taking a klezmer-punk approach. In “Sha Still” (with the slower tempo and especially the guitar solo in the bridge) and “Yiddish Honga” (especially the metal/metalcore breakdown), I hear a klezmer-metal approach.

I feel they are different approaches. Bénédicte [violinist] and I are punk music fans. Julian [guitarist] and Roman [bassist] are metal fans. So we play both styles. Depending on the song, the story, and the arrangement, it may be more punk, more metal, or a subtle blend of the two. What links everything is the Yiddish language, the violin, the electric guitars, and the drums.

In “Daloy Polizey,” “Barikadn,” and “Arbetlozer Marsh,” you’re playing old, radical, traditional Yiddish songs. Do you identify as a socialist, communist, anarchist, etc.? Do you find punk messages in Jewish tradition from yesteryear?

We identify as very close to the left-wing political ideas. We don’t bear a specific label. We believe in peace for everybody, equality, justice, love . . . and we are angry about how the world is turning now. All this anger and hope for a better world were already there in the old Yiddish songs (“Daloy Polizey” and “Barikadn” against oppressors, “Arbetlozer Marsh” against poverty, unemployment, and inequality).

We play songs with messages that we agree with, but also just the fact of singing Yiddish songs, in Yiddish, is a claim itself. I consider myself a Yiddishist, and I try to promote the Yiddish language and culture by all means possible. This band is another way for me to promote Yiddish language and culture to people who wouldn’t know about it.

Why do klezmer and punk fit together?

They have the same energy basically (concerning the fast-tempo klezmer songs). Klezmer and punk are festive in a way. They make you want to dance, jump, smile, laugh, and drink beer! I loved the 2 styles of music, and I strongly desired to play in a klezmer-punk band.

In “Arbetlozer Marsh,” you had some lyrics in French. Were you trying to make it relatable for your audience at shows in France? 

Yes. That’s kind of a dilemma: We want to sing in Yiddish, to make Yiddish sound, but most of the people won’t understand what we sing, although the songs tell messages we agree with, such as peace, tolerance, and equality.

We incorporate French lyrics, translated from Yiddish, in order for people to understand a little bit. It’s true that in many punk or metal bands, even when they sing in English, we don’t understand anything. So it’s not that important—we explain a little the meaning or context of the songs during a live show. Most important is the energy.

It’s a difficult time to be Jewish in France. Is there a statement that you’re making by playing such overtly Jewish music in Paris today?

We do not claim to be a Jewish band. Yiddish is a language, and klezmer is a musical tradition. Klunk plays traditional folkloric songs with social themes, of a people who were oppressed, poor, and almost completely killed: Eastern and Central European Jews at the beginning of the 20th century.

Personally, I am not at all religious. And when I discovered the Yiddish world, I found a history of a culture of a people, not necessarily religious, but still Jewish. That was very strong for me as nobody told me about that, and I personally found myself. So it’s the Jewish culture that we claim and not the Jewish religion.

Klunk says F*** all oppressors, dictators, and mean people. Institutionalized religion, politicized religion, is a kind of oppression as strong and fatal as other ideologies. Punk is anti-religious in its essence.

Michael Croland is the author of Oy Oy Oy Gevalt! Jews and Punk, which was published in April 2016 by Praeger (an imprint of ABC-CLIO). Check out the book to learn more about other Jewish punk artists!